Easy Chèvre: Farmer’s Goat cheese

We have an abundance of goat milk and I was running out of things to do with it. But with homeschooling 4 kiddos this year, and chores,  I needed something fast and easy!

Here is how we are making our Chèvre AKA farmer’s cheese using raw milk instead of kefir

Easy Chèvre: Farmer’s Goat cheese

See Detailed Nutrition Info on

Easy Chèvre: Farmer’s Goat cheese

Ingredients

  • 1/2 gallon goat milk
  • scant 2/3c lemon juice
  • 4Tb white vinegar
  • salt to taste
  • any herbs or flavors that you may want

Instructions

  1. Warm the raw milk to about 180*- you don't want to heat it higher because it will affect the texture of your cheese
  2. once you hit 180*, remove from heat
  3. mix in the lemon juice (I say scan 2/3c because you don't need a full 2/3cup)
  4. stir well
  5. mix in the vinegar
  6. Let sit 30 minutes to curdle
  7. Using cheese cloth and a colander inside a bowl, pour the curdled milk into the cheese cloth. You want it to have about 3 layers of cheese cloth I cut a large piece and fold it over 2 times, then pull back one layer, leaving 3 layers total.
  8. Use the cloth to pull up around the milk and then hang above the bowl to strain the whey.
  9. After 1 hour, remove the hanging cheese cloth, and inside you will have cheese! lightly salt, mix un any herbs you want to flavor with, etc.
  10. You can use a cheese press to shape and mold your cheese. I just place mine in plastic wrap, rolling and shaping myself, then put it in the fridge. After it has set, I wrap in aluminum foil and place in a freezer bag and freeze.

 

Disclaimer: Some links on this blog are affiliate links; when you use those links you help support my family, at no additional cost to you.  Thank you!

3 Fall Family Favorite Recipes

With colder months ahead, it’s time to start building up a repertoire of wholesome, hearty, and healthy meals to keep the family fed and happy through the fall and winter seasons.

With the spring and summer growing seasons out of the way, we often assume there will be a shortage of local produce to work with, but in fact, many fruits and vegetables such as apples, sweet potato and pumpkins flourish in the fall. So there are bountiful ingredients to work with and plenty of delicious flavor combinations to explore.

Here are three tasty fall recipes which are all easily adaptable for many dietary needs. These are great for using up any excess home grown produce, emptying the veggies from the freezer, or simply using up whatever canned goods you have available in your pantry that day.


Image Credit: Pexels, Free to Use Licence

Fall vegetable soup

When thinking of the transition into the fall season and deciding which recipes to try, the one that immediately springs to mind is a warm bowl of rich and nutritious vegetable soup – and for good reason! Vegetable soup is versatile, delicious, healthy and affordable, making it a great recipe to feed the family without breaking the bank.

Although a vegetable soup can be made from practically any vegetables, this time of year it’s great to try and use seasonal ingredients such as carrots, squash, potatoes, and kale- then spice these up with comforting fall favorites such as ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg, and garlic.

Soup is very forgiving so don’t be afraid to try new vegetables and flavor combinations if you have certain ingredients that need using up. To make the soup more hearty or to replace the addition of bread, try adding some baby potatoes, lentils, or butter beans for some bulk.

Here’s a quick recipe for a healthy fall vegetable soup that will serve a family of four as a main course and can even be made ahead and reheated later for convenience. If you like your soup chunky then leave your veg pieces larger, if you like it smooth then chop them more finely or blitz them with a blender after cooking and before serving.

For the soup you will need:

  • 2 tbsp of butter or coconut oil, whichever your preference
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 3 large carrots, washed and roughly chopped, no need to peel them
  • 2 cups of diced squash or pumpkin
  • 2 cups of fresh greens (kale or cabbage works great, as does spinach)
  • 2-3 cloves of garlic, crushed or finely chopped
  • 1 can of chickpeas, drained
  • 1 can of diced tomatoes (or use fresh if you like, simply chop)
  • 1 inch of fresh ginger, grated or finely minced
  • 1tsp of ground cinnamon
  • A pinch of chilli powder, (or more if you like it a little spicier)
  • A sprig of fresh thyme or 1tsp of dried thyme
  • 4-5 cups of chicken broth (or vegetable broth if you will be making it for a vegetarian)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • (I double this recipe for our family)

Method:

  1. Add the butter or oil, whichever you are using, to a heavy based saucepan that is large enough to fit in all of the soup ingredients.
  2. Once the butter is melted, cook the onions and carrots until they start to soften and brown, this will take a couple of minutes.
  3. Next add the squash or pumpkin to the pot alongside the crushed garlic and stir for a few minutes until fragrant.
  4. Then add the grated ginger, thyme, and spices. stir to combine, before adding in the chicken or vegetable broth, and your tomatoes.
  5. Bring the soup to a boil, cover with a lid and reduce the heat to simmer for 10 minutes.
  6. Next add the canned chickpeas and your greens and simmer for a further 10 minutes until all the vegetables are cooked. This may take longer for very chunky soups and may take less time if you have diced everything finely.
  7. Add salt and pepper to taste and serve with a slice of chunky bread to sop up all the juices.

This recipe is tremendously versatile, healthy. You can add a scoop of collagen peptides to any soup or meal to make it even more beneficial to skin, hair, and nails! Classic Pumpkin Risotto

Image credit: Pexels. Free to use Licence

As the days get colder and the nights draw in, we are naturally drawn to more comforting food options that make us feel full and warm from the inside out. A family favorite, and great alternative to traditional pasta dishes, is the classic risotto. Delicious creamy rice served hot and packed full of seasonal vegetables is a winner with the whole family. Once again it can be made in advance and easily reheated.

This recipe will also serve a family of four as a main course or six as a starter.

Fall Family Risotto

Ingredients:

  • 1tbsp of butter
  • 1 tbsp of olive oil
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 2-3 cloves of garlic, crushed
  • A handful of sliced mushrooms, approximately a cup
  • 1.5 cups of risotto rice such as Arborio
  • 1 cup of diced pumpkin
  • 3-4 cups of stock (veg or chicken)
  • ½ cup of grated parmesan cheese
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Fresh parsley to garnish

Method:

  1. Add the butter and oil to a heavy based saucepan and melt together, then cook the onion and garlic until fragrant. Keep the heat low to avoid too much browning, or the garlic will become bitter
  2. Add the raw rice to the onion and garlic mix and stir to coat in the fragrant butter and oil mixture and cook for about one minute until the rice begins to go slightly translucent at the edges.
  3. Now add the mushrooms and pumpkin and cook for another 30 seconds so that they start to soften.
  4. Next add in 1 cup of your chosen broth and stir often until the liquid is almost absorbed.
  5. Continue stirring and adding stock a little at a time until all the stock is absorbed and the rice is cooked through and tender. No need to stir continuously, you just want to stop the rice from burning to the bottom of the pan.
  6. Finally stir through the parmesan cheese (or a little goat cheese if you can’t do cow dairy) and season with salt and pepper to taste, remember that the stock and parmesan are both quite salty, so check the risotto before adding any additional salt to the recipe.
  7. If using, garnish with fresh parsley and serve straight away.

This risotto dish is fantastically easy and can be customized with different vegetables and seasoning to suit your palate. Why not try making it with other seasonal ingredients  such as kale, sweet potato, beetroot or using different cheeses to add a subtle difference to the flavor.

Cinnamon spiced oatmeal cookies

Fall isn’t just a fantastic time of year for savory dishes but for sweet treats too. If you’re looking for a healthier alternative to ordinary cookies, then give these cinnamon spiced oatmeal cookies a try – they’re gooey and soft, and great served straight from the oven.

This recipe produces between 12-18 cookies depending how big you make them. If you’re not a fan of fruit in your cookies then you can always substitute in chocolate chips (yum!), chopped nuts or even leave them plain.


Image credit: Pexels, Free to Use Licence

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup all purpose flour (or gluten free flour)
  • ½ cup of wholemeal flour (if not using then add an additional ½ cup of plain all purpose flour)
  • 1 tsp of baking powder
  • ⅓ cup of vegetable or coconut oil
  • ⅔ cup of dark brown sugar or coocnut sugar
  • 1tsp of vanilla
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • ½ cup of dried fruit such as cranberries, sultanas or raisins
  • ½ cup of rolled oats
  • 1 large egg

Method:

This recipe really does have a ‘throw it all in the bowl’ method and is a great one to try with your kids. Before you start have all your ingredients weighed out, this will make things easier or alternatively weigh them directly into the bowl.

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 and line two baking trays with parchment
  2. In a bowl mix together all of your dry ingredients
  3. In another bowl mix together you wet ingredients (you may need to melt the coconut oil)
  4. Combine the two mixtures to create your cookie dough
  5. Roll the cookie dough into balls and place on the trays leaving ample space for them to spread a little as they cook
  6. Bake until browned which will take roughly 15 minutes
  7. Allow to cool on the baking tray and then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely or alternatively eat them whilst they’re still warm and gooey!

Fall is such a magical time of year, the trees begin to change color from green to gold, the temperature drops, and the days get shorter. It’s the perfect time to be creative in the kitchen and use up delicious seasonal produce.

Which one of these recipes will you try?

 

Disclaimer: Some links on this blog are affiliate links; when you use those links you help support my family, at no additional cost to you.  Thank you!

Frugally Feeding Farm Animals {supplementing goats}

originally Published on: Sep 7, 2018

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If you’re a naturally minded, homesteader or farm-girl wanna be like me, then you’re probably here to learn more about something you already love- saving money and caring for your animals.

There are definitely ways to frugally feed your farm animals, and I want to share what I have learned, with you. I have been learning as I go since we got our first chickens in 2011, and I’ve never looked back! This will be a series of several posts about how/what to feed farm animals while saving money and keeping them in top-health, as naturally as possible!

Weeds

If you have flowerbeds, there is nothing better to do with your weeds than feed them back to your animals!

Goats *love* weeds, as they are foragers, not grazers.

Goats eat some of the things cows do and most of the plants they don’t-trees, leaves, bark, roses, shrubs, poison ivy, and weeds to name a few of their favorites. Please be careful with shrubs and some weeds, as there are several plants toxic to goats that are commonly found in yards. Goats, when given a large variety, will often overlook toxic pants. But when given a wheel barrow full of treats, or when allowed to eat in a new area, they will likely eat anything they can get their mouths on.

About 6 weeks ago I weeded the back yard flowerbed, placing all the weeds in a wheelbarrow as I went. When I was done, I simply wheeled the weeds to the goat corral and let them go to town eating!

They loved the treat, climbing in the wheelbarrow, and oddly enough- left the grass I pulled! They devoured the weeds and pruned roses, but didn’t eat the lumps of grass. I should have known!

Trees

About once every 4-8weeks my husband will cut a dead or downed tree on the property and haul it into the goat paddock. The goats and the Dexters go crazy, climbing, eating leaves, and pulling off bark.

Another favorite is hedge apples that have fallen from the orange osage trees; I smash them (usually with a stomp of my boot) to make it easier for the goats to eat them. Did you know goats have oddly small mouth openings? It is very odd …

These are our favorite ways to supplement for our goats. We don’t typically give hand treats; the farm I bought my goats from made a great point- feeding treats outside of feed times can quickly turn your goats into rude, pushy, petting-zoo type goats. You know the ones where you can’t walk, move, or be near them without getting jumped on, pushed over, or head butted for food? Yea, those. We don’t want rude, pushy goats. We want sweet, docile, snuggle, “ooooh, someone looove on me,” goats.

We have given occasional watermelon rhines this summer, but not often (those usually go to the ducks and chickens).

 

Clearing Tree Lines

Our goats really enjoy clearing our tree lines, walking on a lead and clearing weeds around fences, the barn doors, the kids’ trampoline, the chicken coop … the list goes on! My husband set up some runners along our north tree line and the goats love going out there to eat weeds and clean it up for us.  They get poison ivy to munch on, among other yummy weeds, and we get some free weed eating done!

Fermenting Food with an Airlock System {Fermentools}

Disclosure: I received this complimentary product through the Homeschool Review Crew.

fermentools fermentools

Our family enjoys all kinds of fermented foods. A few of our favorites include cherry tomatoes, kombucha, kraut, and kimchi. We are having a lot of fun using the starter kit from Fermentools. Along with making nutritious, fermented foods, our family has had fun learning about the science of fermenting and bacteria. Yay for probiotic rich foods!

Fermentation is the process of bacteria or yeast breaking down a substance, in this case, food. When fermenting kombucha tea, the sugar feeds the SCOBY (or mother bacteria, so to speak), and the SCOBY converts the sugar to a fermented tea. When fermenting kraut or other fruits and vegetables with lacto-fermentation, you use whey combined with a little Himalayan salt, to produce super healthy, good lactic bacteria that ferments the foods.

The pink or gray Himalayan salt used in the fermentation process doesn’t make the food extra salty- it keeps the produce fresh, crunchy, preserves vitamin content, and can slow the fermentation process to allow flavor to develop more fully- all while preventing bad bacteria from growing. The recipe I used this time was from the Fermentools website, a basic jarred sauerkraut.

For this recipe, I simply chopped my cabbage, mashed it a bit using a small pounder to release it’s juices, and then packed in a jar.

Fermentools Kraut Recipe and simple Airlock System

Fermentools Kraut Recipe and simple Airlock System

 

Fermentools Kraut Recipe and simple Airlock System

Fermentools Kraut Recipe and airlock system

We covered with a brine made from the pink salt, then placed the glass weight on top.

Fermentools Kraut Recipe and simple Airlock System

Then to the top of the jar we added the rubber canning gasket, screwed on the stainless steel canning lid, plugged in the stopper and the airlock, and we were in business!

Fermentools Kraut Recipe and simple Airlock System

After about a week we had delicious, pungent kraut! This is full of probiotics, and nutrients- a perfect addition to sandwiches, and suppers.

As you can see, the kraut changed from a lighter green/yellow to a darker color.

Fermentools Kraut Recipe and simple Airlock System

Our kraut turned out delicious! This recipe was very similar to a super market kraut, but with much better crisp and flavor … and of course all the nutrients and probiotics you don’t find in the supermarket brands.

We love that fermentation boosts the good-for-you value of our fruits and veggies. It can make regular vegetables so much more appealing to children and adults, it’s fun to do, and with the starter kit, it’s so simple! 

No crock or jar burping needed with the Fermentools starter kit. The airlock system does all the work for you. At first I had a little bit of water come up through the air lock, because I overfilled my jar ?‍♀️  Which the directions specifically said not to do. But after I poured that liquid out, we didn’t have any more problems and it didn’t affect our food or the fermentation process at  all.

You will notice as you ferment, if you remove the lid and airlock, there is a strong scent- sour but not spoiled- coming from your food. That’s the bacteria multiplying and doing it’s job! You will not see mold or anything growing on your food (that’s a bad sign), but you will see bubbles in the liquid, and often a slight change in color.

The airlock system from Fermentools makes fermenting absolutely fool proof. It’s so easy to ferment using just salt, and now you can do it without needing to constantly give attention to your jar. Once your fermentation is done, remove the lid and airlock system, rinse with warm water, and store away. Replace the lid with a plastic lid, and your fermented food can go to the fridge to keep. Ours keeps a *long* time. Like … I know we have had kraut last months.  But it’s really so good you will find reasons to eat it with everything!

I love how simple the airlock system is, how complete the starter kit is, and how easily it stores away without taking up space in my kitchen. This is a go to for any real-food foodie in your life!

Connect with Fermentools

 

Check out more reviews from the Crew by clicking the banner below:

Fermenting Food Made Easy with Fermentools

 

Disclaimer: Some links on this blog are affiliate links; when you use those links you help support my family, at no additional cost to you.  Thank you!

Friday on the Farm {LGD getting comfortable}

LGD on the Farm

After losing Huck, we decided to bring Bear out of the goat pen and into the yard with the family and chickens. At first he just hung around the gate to the goats, and slept under the chicken coop.

But after about 2 weeks he really started feeling at home. And by week 3, Bear is a pro at protecting all things chicken and child. His bark at night is so reassuring, and he loves the kids. He follows along on my walks each day, and is such a sweet boy.

We are thankful for having kept 2 of Huck’s puppies, and it sure has me wanting to have some more!

 

Disclaimer: Some links on this blog are affiliate links; when you use those links you help support my family, at no additional cost to you.  Thank you!

{dairy free} Nutritious Baked Oatmeal

baked oatmeal

One of my absolute favorite, go-to recipes for my family’s breakfast is baked oatmeal.  The first recipe I received was from a very dear friend, at an informational class I attended.  I have since modified it just a tiny bit for my family, because we have two children with dairy allergies, we make a dairy free version.

So, I will include those options for my readers that are dairy free as well.

My children ask for this recipe several times a week; they devour it!  We like to enjoy it with eggs, or another protein and some fruit.

*healthful tip: I like to cut down the syrup  by a 1/4c , and no one even misses it!

{dairy free} Nutritious Baked Oatmeal

Rating: 51

Number of servings: 6

See Detailed Nutrition Info on

{dairy free} Nutritious Baked Oatmeal

Ingredients

  • 3 cup old fashioned oats
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup Grade B Maple Syrup, coconut sugar, or sucanat
  • 1/2 cup coconut oil (expeller pressed has no flavor, regular does-either is good in the recipe) or butter
  • 1TB baking powder
  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 tsp real salt (salt should never be solid white-Himalayan pink spat is delicious and has trace minerals)
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2c applesauce
  • *your favorite ad-ins. We've done: pecans, diced apple, frozen blueberries, extra applesauce, pears, and dried coconut

Instructions

  1. Combine oats and water.
  2. Add in remaining ingredients
  3. Pour into greased 8x8 baking dish.
  4. Bake 25 minutes at 350, or until lightly brown and firm.
  5. **if you double the recipe like I often do, pour into a 9x13 baking dish

Notes

**If you would like to soak your oats (which breaks down any anti-nutrients found in grains): *Combine your rolled oats with 1 cup of cultured dairy, such as whey, buttermilk, or yogurt) *Soak overnight. *Omit adding water, continue with the rest of steps.

Where to get Ingredients

If you don’t have these ingredients in your cabinet yet, you should get them if you can.  They are great to keep on hand, and we use them a lot in place of other unhealthier options (margarines, pre packaged oatmeal, sugary breakfast foods)

***You can find a Pure, Grade B Maple Syrup by clicking that link.  The ingredients in that bottle?  Maple Syrup.  =) Log Cabin and similar brands and high fructose corn syrup, which our bodies do not respond to in the same way they do REAL foods like minimally processed Maple Syrup.

***I buy organic rolled oats in bulk from Azurestandard.com

***We use and love Tropical Traditions coconut oils

I also buy my coconut sugar, cinnamon, and aluminum free baking powder from Azure 

I get my Pure Himalayan Salt from Amazon

My eggs come from my backyard, but try to shop from local farmers if you can 🙂

 

Perfect Gluten Free Sourdough Bread Recipe

I have scavenged the internet and cookbooks alike for a perfect gluten free sourdough bread loaf.

Gluten Free Sourdough Bread

Needless to say, it wasn’t easy … and NO ONE seemed to have what I was looking for. Lots of recipes called for added yeast, no sourdough starter at all, lots of different flours, gums, and additives. There were many that used gluten free flours that I don’t keep on hand, or recipes that weren’t for a bread loaf.

But alas, I have done it! After at least a year of messing with recipes, I’ve mixed, matched, and played with it until we finally have a perfect gluten free bread loaf recipe!

For best results, use a gluten free starter like this one, and an all purpose gluten free baking mix

You will need to start feeding your starter the day before you plan to bake bread. For example, if I want to make bread on Wednesday, I will feed my starter on Tuesday, and make the dough that night. It will ferment overnight, and then I will do the short second rise Wednesday morning, then bake.

If you want to make it for an evening meal, just do the fermentation during the day, short second rise, then bake.

**Tip- I feed my starter and put it in the oven, with the light on, to keep it warm. I keep our house pretty cool, so it would take a while for it to really ferment on my counter.

Don’t be intimidated by the length of the recipe! The steps are short and I promise they are simple- much easier than it looks at first. After you make this the first time, you will have no problem making it again and again!

Perfect Gluten Free Sourdough Bread Recipe

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Ingredients

  • 1 cup gluten free sourdough starter FED
  • 2 large eggs
  • 4 TB melted butter
  • 1 1/4 cups milk
  • 2 TB honey
  • 2.5 cups all purpose gluten free flour mix/baking mix
  • 1 TB baking powder
  • 2 tsp salt

Instructions

  1. In a mixing bowl, combine the sourdough starter, eggs, butter, milk, and honey.
  2. In a separate bowl whisk together the flour, baking powder, and salt
  3. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients and mix until combined
  4. Then beat the mixture on medium/high for 3 minutes
  5. With damp fingers or wet spatula, smooth the surface of the dough flat.
  6. Spray the top with oil/Pam (we use coconut oil Pam)
  7. Cover tightly with lid or plastic wrap, and let ferment for at least 4 hours, up to over night (I do overnight)
  8. Oil a 9x5 loaf pan, sprinkle with flour, and with a damp spatula pour the dough into the pan. It will be less of a dough and more like a pancake batter consistency.
  9. Smooth out the top of the bread and, spray the top with Pam again, cover loosely and let rise for about an hour, up to 90 minutes. It should reach the top of the pan.
  10. Preheat oven to 400degrees
  11. Remove plastic wrap and place pan in the oven- turn down temperature to 350 degrees, and bake about 50-55 minutes. Let cool completely before cutting.
  12. I tried removing the bread at 40 and 45 minutes but it was not done all the way. I took it out at 50 minutes and let it cool. It was just about done. Another minute or 2 and it would have been perfect.
  13. The middle of the bread should be 200 degrees if you have a meat thermometer handy.

 

When you are done using the 1 cup of starter, you can feed your “mother” starter, and place it back in the fridge to live happily until the next baking day. I often go ahead and feed mine again for sourdough pancakes, while I have it out.

Disclaimer: Some links on this blog are affiliate links; when you use those links you help support my family, at no additional cost to you.  Thank you!

Gluten Free Sourdough Pancake Recipe {starter + flour}

I wanted to share a gluten free sourdough pancake recipe, using your starter and flour at home. I have 2 recipes that I’ve modified for our family (from non starter recipes using yeast packets)- one uses only starter (the next post), and another uses starter and flour. That’s this recipe.

I typically use the starter + flour recipe, because I don’t always have enough starter for the other version.

We do double this recipe; as with most sourdough recipes, it does best with a well established, fed starter. So plan to feed starter the night or early morning before. =)

 

Sourdough Pancake Recipes {with flour version}

Number of servings: 8

See Detailed Nutrition Info on

Sourdough Pancake Recipes {with flour version}

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all purpose flour (we use all purpose gluten free flour)
  • 4 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 2 TB sugar (we use coconut sugar)
  • 1 tsp pink salt
  • 1 cup sourdough starter
  • 1 1/2 cups milk of choice (we use fresh goat milk or almond milk, as we have cow milk intolerances)
  • 1 large egg, beaten
  • 2 TB oil-refined (no flavor) coconut works well

Instructions

  1. Whisk together dry ingredients
  2. Mix together the oil, egg, milk and starter
  3. Heat cast iron skillet, griddle, or ceramic non stick pan
  4. using 1/4c measuring cup to pour batter on skillet
  5. **The secret to perfect pancakes is to wait for the edges to bubble and brown. The center will usually bubble and puff also. But the pancakes are NOT ready to flip until the edges are a beautiful golden brown.
  6. Cook pancakes through and enjoy with REAL maple syrup!


Disclaimer: Some links on this blog are affiliate links; when you use those links you help support my family, at no additional cost to you.  Thank you!

How to Make Easy Kombucha at Home {DIY fermented foods}

Here are the simple instruction for how we make kombucha at home- our whole family enjoys kombucha, especially the kids. It is so fun in summer when it gets a really wild, fizzy taste from the warm, humid air.

Easy DIY Kombucha at Home

I keep our kombucha in a 2 gallon crock like this one. You can find a SCOBY here.

One-Quart Batch:

  • 1½ teaspoon loose tea or 2 tea bags
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 2-3 cups water
  • ½ cup starter tea or vinegar

Half-Gallon Batch:

  • 1 tablespoon loose tea or 4 tea bags
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 6-7 cups water
  • 1 cup starter tea or vinegar

Gallon Batch (I double this for the 2 gallon croc):

  • 2 tablespoons loose tea or 8 tea bags
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 13-14 cups water
  • 2 cups starter tea or vinegar
  1. Make the sweet tea by boiling the water, adding sugar, and steeping tea according to instructions; allow to cool completely (hot tea will kill the SCOBY)
  2. Add tea, SCOBY, and starter to the croc/jar and let ferment for 5-7 days.

The more kombucha you make with your SCOBY, the better the flavor will become. Older SCOBYs produce a much more flavorful batch than baby SCOBYs.

What I Use

I like to use a combo of oolong and black tea. You can really use any kind of caffeinated tea. I also like using tea from  Strand Tea. My friend who introduced me to kombucha started me using their teas, and I still use them.

Any kind of white sugar will do for making the tea sweet; because the SCOBY eats it, you don’t need to worry about drinking sugary tea. =)

 

 

Disclaimer: Some links on this blog are affiliate links; when you use those links you help support my family, at no additional cost to you.  Thank you!

Learning About Other Cultures in Your Homeschool

In our homeschool, we love learning about other cultures. We have done so by using Sonlight Curriculum, watching documentaries, and doing fun activities.

When our kids go to interview for a job one day, there’s a strong possibility that the person on the other side of the desk isn’t part of the same culture that they are. Learning about other cultures promotes respect for others, love, and a true Christian attitude.

One of my very favorite resources for teaching world cultures is Give Your Child the World: Raising Globally Minded Kids One Book at a Time.

Featuring a carefully curated reading treasury of the best children’s literature for each area of the globe, as well as practical parenting suggestions and inspiration, Give Your Child the World helps moms and dads raise insightful, compassionate kids who fall in love with the world and are prepared to change it for good.

Learning about Other Cultures

Pexels Source CCO License

 

Experiment With Cooking 

Perhaps one of the easiest ways to explore a new culture is with cuisine. You can think about trying out some different recipes in the kitchen, and letting the kids join in on the fun. The best part is a lot of these recipes aren’t difficult to learn or master and they are healthy, too!  For instance, try a recipe for Sambar that can be prepared in minutes and is sure to be a family favorite.

Try a New Experience/Trip

After reading good books and trying new foods from another culture, you might want to go on a trip somewhere. Obviously, there are some highly popular options for kids’ vacations. But to immerse them in a new culture, you may want to think outside the box here. There’s a ban right now on a lot of European countries due to the Coronavirus. However, this will likely settle down by the summer.

During this time, you should have a wide range of options for family travel. But even looking in your own backyard at cultural grocery stores, shops, and experiences will be enough to create a family memory.

Provide Them With The Right Resources

This could be as simple as choosing a different type of film for a movie night with the family- Disney+ and Amazon Prime are full of documentaries. Instead of the classic Disney film, why not explore some of the options from other cultures on your fav streaming service? You’ll find that there are some fantastic possibilities here. 

Sometimes we have friends or family that can help us submerge our kids in a new culture- spending a day with someone cooking foods, preparing for a celebration, or just chatting is a great way to learn about areas and peoples of our world.

Our favorite way to learn is through good books. There are so many wonderful children’s books that help kids understand how other cultures live.

So often we grow up only knowing and understanding the tiny bubble around us. Learning about others creates adults who don’t see color or differences as a prejudice, but as a celebration of who we are.

learning about other culturesPic Source Image Credit CCO License


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