{dairy free} Nutritious Baked Oatmeal

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One of my absolute favorite, go-to recipes for my family’s breakfast is baked oatmeal.  The first recipe I received was from a very dear friend, at an informational class I attended.  I have since modified it just a tiny bit for my family, because we have two children with dairy allergies, we make a dairy free version.

So, I will include those options for my readers that are dairy free as well.

My children ask for this recipe several times a week; they devour it!  We like to enjoy it with eggs, or another protein and some fruit.

*healthful tip: I like to cut down the syrup  by a 1/4c , and no one even misses it!

{dairy free} Nutritious Baked Oatmeal

Rating: 51

Number of servings: 6

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{dairy free} Nutritious Baked Oatmeal

Ingredients

  • 3 cup old fashioned oats
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup Grade B Maple Syrup, coconut sugar, or sucanat
  • 1/2 cup coconut oil (expeller pressed has no flavor, regular does-either is good in the recipe) or butter
  • 1TB baking powder
  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 tsp real salt (salt should never be solid white-Himalayan pink spat is delicious and has trace minerals)
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2c applesauce
  • *your favorite ad-ins. We've done: pecans, diced apple, frozen blueberries, extra applesauce, pears, and dried coconut

Instructions

  1. Combine oats and water.
  2. Add in remaining ingredients
  3. Pour into greased 8x8 baking dish.
  4. Bake 25 minutes at 350, or until lightly brown and firm.
  5. **if you double the recipe like I often do, pour into a 9x13 baking dish

Notes

**If you would like to soak your oats (which breaks down any anti-nutrients found in grains): *Combine your rolled oats with 1 cup of cultured dairy, such as whey, buttermilk, or yogurt) *Soak overnight. *Omit adding water, continue with the rest of steps.

Where to get Ingredients

If you don’t have these ingredients in your cabinet yet, you should get them if you can.  They are great to keep on hand, and we use them a lot in place of other unhealthier options (margarines, pre packaged oatmeal, sugary breakfast foods)

***You can find a http://quietinthechaos.com/reviews-pof-dating-site/ by clicking that link.  The ingredients in that bottle?  Maple Syrup.  =) Log Cabin and similar brands and high fructose corn syrup, which our bodies do not respond to in the same way they do REAL foods like minimally processed Maple Syrup.

***I buy organic rolled oats in bulk from Azurestandard.com

***We use and love Tropical Traditions coconut oils

I also buy my coconut sugar, cinnamon, and aluminum free baking powder from Azure 

I get my Pure Himalayan Salt from Amazon

My eggs come from my backyard, but try to shop from local farmers if you can 🙂

 

Perfect Gluten Free Sourdough Bread Recipe

I have scavenged the internet and cookbooks alike for a perfect gluten free sourdough bread loaf.

Gluten Free Sourdough Bread

Needless to say, it wasn’t easy … and NO ONE seemed to have what I was looking for. Lots of recipes called for added yeast, no sourdough starter at all, lots of different flours, gums, and additives. There were many that used gluten free flours that I don’t keep on hand, or recipes that weren’t for a bread loaf.

But alas, I have done it! After at least a year of messing with recipes, I’ve mixed, matched, and played with it until we finally have a perfect gluten free bread loaf recipe!

For best results, use a gluten free starter like this one, and an all purpose gluten free baking mix

You will need to start feeding your starter the day before you plan to bake bread. For example, if I want to make bread on Wednesday, I will feed my starter on Tuesday, and make the dough that night. It will ferment overnight, and then I will do the short second rise Wednesday morning, then bake.

If you want to make it for an evening meal, just do the fermentation during the day, short second rise, then bake.

**Tip- I feed my starter and put it in the oven, with the light on, to keep it warm. I keep our house pretty cool, so it would take a while for it to really ferment on my counter.

Don’t be intimidated by the length of the recipe! The steps are short and I promise they are simple- much easier than it looks at first. After you make this the first time, you will have no problem making it again and again!

Perfect Gluten Free Sourdough Bread Recipe

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Ingredients

  • 1 cup gluten free sourdough starter FED
  • 2 large eggs
  • 4 TB melted butter
  • 1 1/4 cups milk
  • 2 TB honey
  • 2.5 cups all purpose gluten free flour mix/baking mix
  • 1 TB baking powder
  • 2 tsp salt

Instructions

  1. In a mixing bowl, combine the sourdough starter, eggs, butter, milk, and honey.
  2. In a separate bowl whisk together the flour, baking powder, and salt
  3. Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients and mix until combined
  4. Then beat the mixture on medium/high for 3 minutes
  5. With damp fingers or wet spatula, smooth the surface of the dough flat.
  6. Spray the top with oil/Pam (we use coconut oil Pam)
  7. Cover tightly with lid or plastic wrap, and let ferment for at least 4 hours, up to over night (I do overnight)
  8. Oil a 9x5 loaf pan, sprinkle with flour, and with a damp spatula pour the dough into the pan. It will be less of a dough and more like a pancake batter consistency.
  9. Smooth out the top of the bread and, spray the top with Pam again, cover loosely and let rise for about an hour, up to 90 minutes. It should reach the top of the pan.
  10. Preheat oven to 400degrees
  11. Remove plastic wrap and place pan in the oven- turn down temperature to 350 degrees, and bake about 50-55 minutes. Let cool completely before cutting.
  12. I tried removing the bread at 40 and 45 minutes but it was not done all the way. I took it out at 50 minutes and let it cool. It was just about done. Another minute or 2 and it would have been perfect.
  13. The middle of the bread should be 200 degrees if you have a meat thermometer handy.

 

When you are done using the 1 cup of starter, you can feed your “mother” starter, and place it back in the fridge to live happily until the next baking day. I often go ahead and feed mine again for sourdough pancakes, while I have it out.

Disclaimer: Some links on this blog are affiliate links; when you use those links you help support my family, at no additional cost to you.  Thank you!

Gluten Free Sourdough Pancake Recipe {starter + flour}

I wanted to share a gluten free sourdough pancake recipe, using your starter and flour at home. I have 2 recipes that I’ve modified for our family (from non starter recipes using yeast packets)- one uses only starter (the next post), and another uses starter and flour. That’s this recipe.

I typically use the starter + flour recipe, because I don’t always have enough starter for the other version.

We do double this recipe; as with most sourdough recipes, it does best with a well established, fed starter. So plan to feed starter the night or early morning before. =)

 

Sourdough Pancake Recipes {with flour version}

Number of servings: 8

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Sourdough Pancake Recipes {with flour version}

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all purpose flour (we use all purpose gluten free flour)
  • 4 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 2 TB sugar (we use coconut sugar)
  • 1 tsp pink salt
  • 1 cup sourdough starter
  • 1 1/2 cups milk of choice (we use fresh goat milk or almond milk, as we have cow milk intolerances)
  • 1 large egg, beaten
  • 2 TB oil-refined (no flavor) coconut works well

Instructions

  1. Whisk together dry ingredients
  2. Mix together the oil, egg, milk and starter
  3. Heat cast iron skillet, griddle, or ceramic non stick pan
  4. using 1/4c measuring cup to pour batter on skillet
  5. **The secret to perfect pancakes is to wait for the edges to bubble and brown. The center will usually bubble and puff also. But the pancakes are NOT ready to flip until the edges are a beautiful golden brown.
  6. Cook pancakes through and enjoy with REAL maple syrup!


Disclaimer: Some links on this blog are affiliate links; when you use those links you help support my family, at no additional cost to you.  Thank you!

How to Make Easy Kombucha at Home {DIY fermented foods}

Here are the simple instruction for how we make kombucha at home- our whole family enjoys kombucha, especially the kids. It is so fun in summer when it gets a really wild, fizzy taste from the warm, humid air.

Easy DIY Kombucha at Home

I keep our kombucha in a 2 gallon crock like this one. You can find a SCOBY here.

One-Quart Batch:

  • 1½ teaspoon loose tea or 2 tea bags
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 2-3 cups water
  • ½ cup starter tea or vinegar

Half-Gallon Batch:

  • 1 tablespoon loose tea or 4 tea bags
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 6-7 cups water
  • 1 cup starter tea or vinegar

Gallon Batch (I double this for the 2 gallon croc):

  • 2 tablespoons loose tea or 8 tea bags
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 13-14 cups water
  • 2 cups starter tea or vinegar
  1. Make the sweet tea by boiling the water, adding sugar, and steeping tea according to instructions; allow to cool completely (hot tea will kill the SCOBY)
  2. Add tea, SCOBY, and starter to the croc/jar and let ferment for 5-7 days.

The more kombucha you make with your SCOBY, the better the flavor will become. Older SCOBYs produce a much more flavorful batch than baby SCOBYs.

What I Use

I like to use a combo of oolong and black tea. You can really use any kind of caffeinated tea. I also like using tea from  Strand Tea. My friend who introduced me to kombucha started me using their teas, and I still use them.

Any kind of white sugar will do for making the tea sweet; because the SCOBY eats it, you don’t need to worry about drinking sugary tea. =)

 

 

Disclaimer: Some links on this blog are affiliate links; when you use those links you help support my family, at no additional cost to you.  Thank you!

Learning About Other Cultures in Your Homeschool

In our homeschool, we love learning about other cultures. We have done so by using Sonlight Curriculum, watching documentaries, and doing fun activities.

When our kids go to interview for a job one day, there’s a strong possibility that the person on the other side of the desk isn’t part of the same culture that they are. Learning about other cultures promotes respect for others, love, and a true Christian attitude.

One of my very favorite resources for teaching world cultures is Give Your Child the World: Raising Globally Minded Kids One Book at a Time.

Featuring a carefully curated reading treasury of the best children’s literature for each area of the globe, as well as practical parenting suggestions and inspiration, Give Your Child the World helps moms and dads raise insightful, compassionate kids who fall in love with the world and are prepared to change it for good.

Learning about Other Cultures

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Experiment With Cooking 

Perhaps one of the easiest ways to explore a new culture is with cuisine. You can think about trying out some different recipes in the kitchen, and letting the kids join in on the fun. The best part is a lot of these recipes aren’t difficult to learn or master and they are healthy, too!  For instance, try a recipe for Sambar that can be prepared in minutes and is sure to be a family favorite.

Try a New Experience/Trip

After reading good books and trying new foods from another culture, you might want to go on a trip somewhere. Obviously, there are some highly popular options for kids’ vacations. But to immerse them in a new culture, you may want to think outside the box here. There’s a ban right now on a lot of European countries due to the Coronavirus. However, this will likely settle down by the summer.

During this time, you should have a wide range of options for family travel. But even looking in your own backyard at cultural grocery stores, shops, and experiences will be enough to create a family memory.

Provide Them With The Right Resources

This could be as simple as choosing a different type of film for a movie night with the family- Disney+ and Amazon Prime are full of documentaries. Instead of the classic Disney film, why not explore some of the options from other cultures on your fav streaming service? You’ll find that there are some fantastic possibilities here. 

Sometimes we have friends or family that can help us submerge our kids in a new culture- spending a day with someone cooking foods, preparing for a celebration, or just chatting is a great way to learn about areas and peoples of our world.

Our favorite way to learn is through good books. There are so many wonderful children’s books that help kids understand how other cultures live.

So often we grow up only knowing and understanding the tiny bubble around us. Learning about others creates adults who don’t see color or differences as a prejudice, but as a celebration of who we are.

learning about other culturesPic Source Image Credit CCO License


Disclaimer: Some links on this blog are affiliate links; when you use those links you help support my family, at no additional cost to you.  Thank you!

Nutritious, Traditional Food: Homemade Baby Formula Part 1

Originally posted August 2013

I want to do a series on traditionally prepared, nutritious foods.  We have started this journey, as many of you know, in an effort to heal our son’s reflux and gut issues.  Below is a little background on what happened with my now 7 year old (though leaving out a lot of details, not to mention the cost comparison of medicines and formulas vs homemade). 

Obviously, I am in no way a medical professional and am NOT giving you medical or health care advice.  I am offering you information and what you do with it is up to you.  

Mister had terrible reflux, was on Nutramigen baby formula (it is an elemental formula in which the dairy is broken down as much as possible) for dairy protein allergy, and overall his gut was a mess.  I nursed and pumped as long a I could (while doing a dairy free diet myself, for his sake) but Mister refused to nurse after 6 months; I continued to pump but after a month lost my supply.

If you have read anything about traditional foods, or traditional nutrition, you have read that the “gut” is the most vital part of the body- it produces enzymes that affect every single aspect of your body functioning properly, along with so much more we have learned in the last 10 years.

From using hormones to absorbing vitamins and minerals, the condition of your gut determines your overall health.  Period.  (see the bottom of this article for links and resources regarding gut health)

So, here are a list of the ingredients in a can of Nutramigen:

That is a picture taken straight from a can of baby formula in my pantry.  I have no idea why I still have this can.  Maybe it reminds me of how far we have come in just 4 short months.

Can you pronounce any of those words easily?  Do you know what many of those ingredients are?

They aren’t natural.  They are not God made and nature grown.

Ingredients on a package are in order of amount found in that product.  Corn syrup solids are the majority of what is makes up most general baby formulas.

Corn syrups solids are a genetically modified organism (GMO), made from corn and are basically SUGAR.  A crappy, non-nutritional, HIGHLY processed chemical food product.

I can’t even call it a food, because it isn’t.

Corn syrup solids interfere with a hormone which tells your body “hey, you’re full!  Stop eating!”  Therefore you eat more (that’s pretty convenient for food corporations…).

Corn syrup or some form of it is found in almost anything in a package or box.  It is much healthier to find a real food recipe version of your favorite boxed foods and cook them at home.

Check out this link from Dr. Mark Hyman on 5 Reasons Why High Fructose Corn Syrup Will Kill You.

None of those ingredients aid in the health of the gut, body, or absorption of nutrients.  Do babies everywhere survive on that can?  Yes, they do. Do they possibly have unforeseen health complications later in life?  Yes.

Many of those ingredients have been linked to health problems, especially the highly processed High Fructose Corn Syrup, and vegetable oils in that can.  *ick*  I seriously can’t imagine making meals out of that stuff.

So, I did research.  I read.  I bought Nourishing Traditions Cookbook.  FYI- that is a link to the cookbook on Amazon.  

I love it so much I took it to Kinkos and had the covers laminated, and the binding spiral bound so I can lay it flat and it makes it easier to flip through 700 pages.

In the Nourishing Traditions cookbook, there are recipes for baby formula (it is also found on Weston A Price website).  One uses raw milk or goats milk, which with a dairy protein allergy Max cannot have. *for baby #4 in 2016, I did make the goat milk formula for our baby and it worked well. We will do it again for Baby #5 if necessary

The other uses liver and bone broth.  *ding ding ding*

So, I went back to searching for organic grassfed beef bones for stock and liver, and all the ingredients I needed for the formula.  After I found them all, we decided to dive in and do it!

I began weaning him onto the meat-based formula the week we left for a trip in June.  I made up a few batches, froze them, and took them with us.  By the time we got home he was on the homemade formula full time, in addition to his solids.

No more nutrient void commercial formula.

A few chiropractor visits later, and Max is no longer on medication.  His gut is healed- thanks to that bone broth and it’s mineral producing gelatin, no doubt.  The chiropractor also did work on his gut, you can read about that here.  (Google the importance on bone broth in your diet). **This was all pre-the big bone broth craze of paleo and keto fads. But doesn’t change the fact that it is affective.

Gosh, it really brings me to tears writing this out.

His belly is healed.  He occasionally spits up, but usually only when I get his bottle too warm, or he gulps it down.

Oddly, after I started Max on the homemade formula, he became a new baby in many ways.  He started napping better, was generally happier, and his development shot off.

He no longer has reflux, and there aren’t acid reflux stains on his bed sheets anymore.  Even on his medicines there were smelly, acidic stains on his sheets after a nap, or first thing in the morning, from refulx.

Traditional, WHOLE foods healed my son’s gut.

Not a medicine that masks symptoms.

Hard work and healthy food.

So, what is this homemade, meat-based baby formula recipe, you may be asking?
From Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon, page 603 here it is:

3 3/4 cups homemade beef or chicken broth (recipe from page 122 or 124)
2 ounces organic liver
5 Tablespoon lactose
1 teaspoon infant probiotic
1/4 cup homemade liquid whey
1 Tablespoon organic coconut oil
1 teaspoon codliver oil (I use Green Pastures)
1 teaspoon UNrefined sunflower oil
2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil
1/4 teaspoon acerola powder

Now, assume all those ingredients are from only the best sources and are organic.  Because anything you can get from Walmart probably isn’t the best quality ingredient. **In 2019, you can actually find a lot of organic foods and ingredients in Walmart and Kroger- yay!

I found mine at: http://www.radiantlifecatalog.com/ and I get my coconut oil from http://www.tropicaltraditions.com/

I use Weston A Price Foundation as a HUGE source of information and health related articles, along with Nourishing Traditions– it is so much more than a cookbook!  It is over 700 pages of wisdom, science, and traditional health information.

The point of this recipe is that all ingredients are natural, whole, raw sources of the vitamins, minerals, and nutrients a baby needs-they can be easily absorbed and the body knows what to do with them.  They are not processed or found in a man made vitamin capsule.  (you can overdose on synthetic vitamins, but it is much harder to do so with natural sources because your body knows how to use them and rid of excess.)

I also want to include the breakdown of the nutritional analysis done by Sally Fallon and Weston A Price Foundation of breastmilk and these homemade formulas.  Obviously breast milk is BEST, provided the mother eats a nutritious diet, but some of us aren’t able to nurse or continue nursing.

This is a good alternative for my family:

Based on 36 ounces.
Breast Milk
Cow’s Milk
Formula
Goat Milk
Formula
Liver-Based
Formula
Calories
766
856
890
682
Protein
11.3g
18g
18g
15g
Carbohydrates
76g
79g
77g
69g
Total Fat
48g
52g
54g
36g
Saturated Fat
22g
28g
30g
16g
Mono Fat
18g
16g
16g
12g
Poly Fat
5.5g
5.6g
5.7g
5.6g
Omega-3 FA
.58g
1.3g
1.2g
1.0g
Omega-6 FA
4.4g
4.2g
4.4g
4.5g
Cholesterol
153mg
137mg
166mg
227mg
Vitamin A*
946IU
5000IU
5000IU
20,000IU
Thiamin-B1
.15mg
1.05mg
1.1mg
.19mg
Riboflavin-B2
.4mg
1.2mg
1.2mg
1.9mg
Niacin-B3
1.9mg
2.5mg
4.4mg
14.2mg
Vitamin B6
.12mg
.51mg
.60mg
.65mg
Vitamin B12
.5mcg
1.9mcg
2.8mcg
39mcg
Folate
57mcg
236mcg
284mcg
159mcg
Vitamin C
55mg
57mg
59mg
62mg
Vitamin D
480IU
450IU
525IU
460IU
Vitamin E***
9.9mg
6.2mg
4.7mg
4.9mg
Calcium
355mg
532mg
548mg
NA**
Copper
.57mg
.38mg
.58mg
1.9mg
Iron
.33mg
1.4mg
2.2mg
5.4mg
Magnesium
37.4mg
91.3mg
96.1mg
34.5mg
Manganese
.29mg
.034mg
.12mg
.24mg
Phosphorus
151mg
616mg
729mg
344mg
Potassium
560mg
949mg
1228mg
750mg
Selenium
18.8mcg
15.4mcg
18.7mcg
31.1mcg
Sodium
186mg
308mg
320mg
NA**
Zinc
1.9mg
2.8mg
2.7mg
2.5mg
* Vitamin A levels in human milk will depend on the diet of the mother. Nursing mothers eating vitamin A-rich foods such as cod liver oil will have much higher levels of vitamin A in their milk. Commercial formulas contain about 2400 IU vitamin A per 800 calories.
** Calcium and sodium values for homemade broth are not available.
*** Vitamin E values are derived from commercial vegetable oils. The vitamin E levels for homemade formulaswill be higher if good quality, expeller-expressed oils are used.

At first I was embarrassed and scared to tell people I made Mister’s formula. As in most things, when you go against the grain or do something differently that mainstream society, people think you’re a little wacky. In 2019, it can be easier for people to see the benefits of real, nutritious food for all stages of life, than it was even in 2013.

I am proud to say we worked hard, and we healed Max’s gut (and therefore damage caused by the commercial formulas and medicines we had tried).  He is healthy, growing, and gaining weight better than he ever did the first half of his first  year.

We are approaching his first birthday, and I am so thankful.

 READ PART 2 HERE

Articles on gut health:

 

Nutritious, Traditional Food How To: {Weston A. Price} Homemade Baby Formula Part 2

Originally posted October 2013
A few months back I left you with some information about the homemade, meat based baby formula we make at our home.
(Well, were making. Mister is almost 14 months old now, and we have weaned onto a coconut milk tonic. But I have read where many families used the homemade broth up to 2 years).

So, what is this homemade, meat-based baby formula recipe, you may be asking?

From Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats by Sally Fallon, page 603 here it is:

***Please see my previous post HERE for LOTS of details on this recipe, and where to find the ingredients.***


Here is my method for making this formula.

  • I first made my bone broth, either chicken in the crock pot, or beef bone broth in a huge stock pot.
  • Then collect all my ingredients and get out my measuring spoons for each.

 

  • Start the broth on a simmer for cooking the liver. Here is my simmering broth:
  • I slice the beef liver into strips and then cut it into about 1″ pieces so it cooks quickly.
  • Next, I add the organic, grassfed beef liver to the broth. I Simmer for a few minutes, or until it is no longer pink.
I know, it’s raw liver. That is pure, nutritious gold right there, y’all!
  • After it is cooked, I spoon out the liver and placed into the food processor. Then pour some of the liquid into the food processor with the liver. Puree it until it is liquefied (this will take some time- you’re liquefying a meat, so be patient! You need as much of the meat as you can get in the formula). *Be careful to let it cool some or you will have exploding beef liver juice flying all over your kitchen. Ask me how I know … Depending on how old your food processor is, you may need to upgrade to the Best Food Processor to ensure that you end up with a smooth paste. Outdated processors are great for chunky recipes and breadcrumbs, but with this recipe, you need a processor that will give you an even consistency.
  • Strain the liquefied liver through a mesh strainer into a bowl with the rest of the broth. **Liver has an entire strip of some kind gristle running through it. You need to strain this out, which is why I run mine through a strainer. The gristle DOES NOT liquefy. I have read other tutorials that fail to mention that … and then I wondered why it wouldn’t go through the nipple of Mister’s bottle. You must strain out the gristle. Okay. Got it? Strain the gristle….
My liver infused broth in a bowl, with some of my ingredients
  • Then I add in the amount of each ingredient the recipe calls for, and whisk it very well. I add the powdered ingredients first, so they can dissolve while it is warm. Then pour it into jars, using a wide mouth funnel for ease of filling the jars.
**Tips**
  • One batch makes about 36 ounces, which at 8 months was enough for one day for my son. I made this in triple and quadruple batches, so I didn’t have to make it every day. My understanding is it will last 5 days in the fridge just fine. Ours certainly did. Do what you think is best.
  • Shake it well before pouring each time. The fats (olive oil, coconut oil, and cod liver oil) in the formula will separate when chilled in the fridge, so shake, shake, shake. But be sure the lid is on nice and tight, or you will have a huge mess of beef liver baby formula all over your kitchen. Ask me how I know..

There you have it, how we make the homemade baby formula from Weston A Price and Nourishing Traditions.

This post may contain affiliate links.

Perfect Hobbies for Kids

When young children adopt new hobbies, they discover all sorts of new skills and learn some important life lessons. Through hobbies, children can find what lights them up and excites them at a young age, as opposed to doing it later on when they feel it’s ‘too late’ to do anything about it.

My husband and I are both huge hobby lovers- crafting, journaling, sewing, embroidery, painting, woodworking, gardening, leather work, and animal husbandry … the list goes on! We have enjoy distilling a love for handicrafts and hobbies in our children, and watching them grow in their skills.

Here are just a few hobbies children of all ages could test out!

hobbies for kids

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Reading And Writing

Reading to children is essential for language social, emotional, and cognitive development.  Reading aloud to children will improve their listening and speaking skills, and they might even become good writers themselves, as it can help them to develop their own imagination. Once children have learned to read on their own, cultivating a love for reading is one of out biggest jobs! A child that loves to read loves to learn, and from there they will grow into unstoppable, teachable, curious adults. Loving to write often comes when a child enjoys reading, because they are driven to write their own stories.

Visiting Places of Interest

Traveling to visit a historical site, a history or pop up museum, a well loved author’s home, and other sites of interest can be a brilliant hobby for a child. As well as having fun and exploring, they will learn plenty from immersing themselves in culture. It gives them a base to build plenty of other hobbies on – writing, crafts, and reading, for example. Anything you can study in science, history, art and literature can be turned into a field trip, or family road trip. There is so much to experience no matter what your child loves to learn about-get out there and explore!

Building and Engineering

Children love to build- what they can build and create with blocks, legos, and Magnatiles is endless. From model bridges and giant towers, to cars and boats, they can have an incredible amount of fun building just about anything that takes their fancy.  Expand their possibilities by providing a child-friendly tool kit which allows them to build whatever they like-a small hammer, screw drivers, age appropriate nails, nuts, bolts, washers, screws, zip-ties, etc can be kept in an old tool box near some scrap wood, so kids can easily create!

Painting

Painting is an excellent way for children to learn to express themselves. Open ended art-meaning, no defined assignment, no rules- allows for the most creativity. If they paint the sky green, let them have a green sky. This again goes back to helping them develop their imaginations and having confidence in their abilities. You never know – you may have the next Picasso in your family! =)

Gardening

Gardening not only helps children develop an interest in nature and stay active, but it also strengthens their immune systems. Why not give them their small plot of garden to play with and grow things? You could let them grow things inside the house if space is at a premium. A plot of land, or a potted plant, either way we are cultivating a sense of responsibility and nurturing in our kids!

Cooking & Handicrafts

Cooking is an essential skill for anybody to learn – after all, everybody needs to eat! Let them cook with you from a young age, and maybe start letting them use cooking kits when they are old enough. Children of all ages can help in the kitchen-prepping oatmeal, mixing, stirring, browning meat, poor liquids, measuring ingredients. Get them involved and enjoy your time together!

hobbies for kids

Handicrafts are anything children can do with their hands- sewing, knitting, crocheting, whittling, calligraphy, cross stitching, dyeing yard, quilting, bead work, wood working, pottery, mosaics the list goes on and on and on. We do handicrafts while listening to audiobooks, while I read aloud, or while watching an art video.

Let your children find a hobby that they enjoy and you’ll notice a vast difference in their confidence. Starting them off while they are young gives kids the chance to know what excites them and can help them find their passion in life later! Most any hobby requires a skill, and those skills can mean enjoyable work later in life.

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Easy Dairy Free Quinoa Breakfast Mash

Easy Dairy Free Quinoa Breakfast Mash

We have been in a breakfast rut for a few months now. We have tried so many breakfast recipes for oats and quinoa, and my kids haven’t liked any of them.  Today I mashed together a few different ideas and came up with something they did like.  Well- my daughters liked … my son still prefers oatmeal and an egg sandwich.  *sigh*

The struggle of feeding 4 children real, nutritious food is real, y’all.

This makes about 4+ servings, depending on how much your children eat.  This would last us about 2 days in our house, with 2 of 4 kids eating a bowl.

Quinoa Breakfast Mash

20 minutes

See Detailed Nutrition Info on

Quinoa Breakfast Mash

Ingredients

  • 2 cans coconut milk
  • 2 cups uncooked quinoa
  • 4-8 TB of Pure Grade B Maple Syrup
  • 1 cup water
  • salt to taste
  • your choice of topping- dried coconut, craisins, raisins, sliced banana, etc

Instructions

  1. Add all ingredients (exclude toppings) to a pot
  2. Bring to a boil
  3. partially cover and turn down to a simmer until most of the liquid is absorbed, about 15 minutes
  4. Serve with dried coconut sprinkled on top

This recipe is prepared dairy free, but I imagine it would be even more delicious with a pat of butter on top. =)

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Applesauce Teriyaki Pork Loin {a favorite}

I am always looking for new recipes to add as staples into our recipe circulation.  I had a pork loin in the freezer (actually, a 2-pack) and wanted to cook it for dinner, but wanted something different than our normal pork loin.  I found a recipe for applesauce pork loin, and tweaked it a bit for our tastes (read: added flavor!)

Applesauce Teriyaki Pork Loin

Applesauce Teriyaki Pork Loin {a favorite}

1 hour, 30 minutes

Number of servings: 6

See Detailed Nutrition Info on

Ingredients

  • 1 boneless pork loin roast 2-3 pounds, or 2 small pork loins
  • pink salt to taste
  • black pepper to taste
  • 2 tablespoons (expeller pressed) coconut oil or olive oil
  • 1 cup applesauce
  • 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1-2 tablespoons of Teriyaki sauce
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced

Instructions

  1. salt and pepper each side of pork loin to taste (I am generous here)
  2. brown each side in oil using large skillet, over medium heat
  3. mix all other ingredients in a bowl
  4. place pork loin(s) in a baking dish, or on roast pan
  5. using spoon, ladle applesauce mixture over pork loin(s)
  6. **note** I reserve some applesauce mixture to glaze the pork after it comes out of the oven. You don't have to do this.

I usually serve this with mashed potatoes and salad, or roasted veggies and salad.  My family devours it!  As a matter of fact … it was so delicious I forgot to take an “after” photo before they ate it all, so I had to use a stock photo.  (sorry about that)

I would love to hear your favorite pork recipe, tell me about it in the comments!

Disclaimer: Some links on this blog are affiliate links; when you use those links you help support my family, at no additional cost to you.  Thank you!

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